07 Observações sobre as diferentes latinidades

OBSERVAÇÕES SOBRE AS DIFERENTES LATINIDADES. OBSERVATIONS ON THE DIFFERENT FORMS OF WRITING LATIN. PROF. DR. DARCY CARVALHO. SÃO PAULO. SP. BRASIL 

Contents: 01 02 03 04 05

The usual presentation of the Latin language according to the school grammars  masks the fact that particular authors write Latin in their own way, differing from one another in vocabulary and sintaxe. The realization of this fact has extreme importance for the modern latinist.  

01= BIBLIOGRAFIA. A GENERAL BRAZILIAN BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR THE STUDY OF THE LATIN LANGUAGE

Esta bibliografia disponibiliza para downloads dicionários e as principais obras didáticas utilizadas no Brasil, para o ensino do Latim, em português e noutros idiomas europeus. Dictionaries and textbooks used in Brazil for teaching Latin.

http://archive.org/search.php?query=creator%3A%22DARCY%20CARVALHO%22&sort=-downloads

02= As obras anexadas para leitura neste capítulo evidenciam um fato comum, o da extrema discrepância entre os autores latinos, não só quanto ao uso do vocabulário como da sintaxe. A ditadura do bom estilo implantada pelos imitadores de Cicero , César e dos poetas da era augustana, começou a ser superada já no seculo II, para reaparecer onze ou doze  séculos depois no renascimento. O reaparecimento do latim clássico no momento em que os idiomas vernáculos começavam a se afirmar como idiomas escritos foi extremamente prejudicial à sua conservação.

03. THE 3RD TO THE 5TH CENTURY: THE RISE OF CHRISTIAN LATIN LITERATURE. THE BEGINNING OF THE MIDDLE AGES

The early history of medieval Latin literature is in part the story of the reception of the classical past by the Christians, to whom it represented secular culture. Old forms and genres were continuously renewed over the millennium following the entrance of Christians to the circle of literary production, dated for convenience to the conversion of Constantine to Christianity (about ad 313). For example, the Latin epic persisted in recognizable form throughout the period, and its authors remained in continuous contact with the great classical exponents Lucan, Statius, and, above all, Virgil. From the 4th century, the degree of scholarly interpretation applied to these epic poets, especially Virgil, was intensified. Virgilian technique was imitated by many poets, among them the 4th-century Spaniard Juvencus, who versified a portion of the Bible, and the author of the epic poem Waltharius (probably 9th century), written in hexameters. Even before the conversion of Constantine, Christians were developing new forms of literature, which persisted throughout the ensuing centuries. The production of hagiographical texts (lives of the saints) was widespread in the Middle Ages. The first Acts of the Martyrs in Latin were written during the 3rd century, and the flowering of the form after the end of the period of persecution of Christians shows the powerful appeal that it exercised at all levels of society. The Passio Sanctarum Perpetuae et Felicitatis (The Passion of SS. Perpetua and Felicity), written in a style that owes little to classical precedent, is a distinctive early example of the genre.

The 3rd and 4th centuries were above all an age of translation. Among the Greek patristic writings diffused to a wider audience in the West in Latin versions, the lives of the Desert Fathers occupied an important place. The Latin translation by Evagrius, bishop of Antioch, of Athanasius’ Life of Saint Antony enjoyed the widest transmission, and its influence is as marked by contrast in the early Latin Lives of the Saints as it is by imitation. Sulpicius Severus’ biography of St. Martin, an original Latin work, greatly influenced hagiography over many centuries. (A further, equally influential example of the genre was the Dialogues of Pope Gregory the Great, written in about 593.) The most important work of translation appeared at the end of the 4th century: the Vulgate, completed by the monastic leader Jerome, replaced sporadic earlier attempts to render the Bible into Latin. The idiom and style of the Bible’s original languages were apparent through the veil of Jerome’s Latin, however, and provided a counterweight to the classical styles that continued to be taught and practiced through the schools in the West. Exegesis of the text occupied many of the greatest minds of the Middle Ages for the largest part of their careers, and the literary work of many major authors, from Augustine and Gregory to Bede, reflects their individual understanding of Scripture.

The early Christian liturgy also gave birth to new forms of literature. From the ancient practice of psalmody in the churches derives the hymn. Ambrose, bishop of Milan in the second half of the 4th century, wrote the earliest prosaic hymns, which incorporated nonliturgical texts into the mass to be sung by the congregation. These were rapidly imitated, notably by the Spanish poet Prudentius at the end of the century, and remained in continuous use in churches and monasteries for more than a millennium. A major problem of Christian thinkers in these centuries was the integration of the history of the pagan empire with the history of salvation. Synthesis and epitome of biblical and classical history appeared in the Historiarum adversus paganos libri VII (7 Books of Histories Against the Pagans) of Orosius and the briefer Chronica (c. 402–404) of Sulpicius Severus. On a larger scale, Augustine’s De civitate Dei (The City of God) offered a comprehensive view of past history, the present, and the world to come in the light of scriptural revelation. His spiritual autobiography, the Confessiones (Confessions), was an exploration of the philosophical and emotional development of an individual soul. The distinctive originality of this work owed little to classical autobiography and was unmatched by later imitations. The Gallic schools of the 5th century gave rise to a literary culture unique in this period. Versification of the Bible developed a new degree of exegetical and stylistic refinement, while the letters of Paulinus of Nola and Sidonius Apollinaris, bishop of Auvergne, display a picture of cultivated aristocratic and ecclesiastical society. Both men were also admired as poets, Sidonius in particular as an encomiast. On the secular side, at the beginning of the century in Rome the Egyptian poet Claudian produced the most elaborate examples of imperial verse panegyric to a succession of dignitaries. His Raptus Proserpinae (c. 400; The Rape of Proserpine) is one of the last examples of an extended narrative in verse that dwells wholly in the world of pagan mythology.

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/331905/Latin-literature/12738/The-3rd-to-the-5th-century-the-rise-of-Christian-Latin-literature

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