ARABIC Língua Árabe Moderna Modern Arabic Arabe moderne

 
ARABIC STUDIES; ESTUDOS ARABES; LINGUA ARABE MODERNA; COMO LER O ALFABETO ARABE; GRAMATICA ARABE ELEMENTAR;  HOW TO READ THE ARABIC ALPHABET; BASIC GRAMMAR OF MODERN ARABIC. PROF. DR. DARCY CARVALHO [26/04/2013].

 

LINGUA ÁRABE MODERNA . BIBLIOGRAFIA ADICIONAL ON LINE

 

1.            APRENDA ARABE SOZINHO POR  A.S. TRITON 

TEACH YOURSELF ARABIC BY A. S. TRITON , PROFESSOR AT SOAS- UNIVERSITY OF LONDON. CONTENTS: ARABIC PRONUNCIATION, 36 GRAMMAR LESSONS , TABLES, KEY TO EXERCISES, INDEX. PROFESSOR TRITON USES NO RUNNING TEXT, EXCEPT FOR ONE ON PAGE 23, A TALE ABOUT A CLEVER HONEST MONKEY. THE WHOLE ARABIC GRAMMAR IS TAUGHT BIT BY BIT WITH DETACHED UNCONNECTED SENTENCES. BEAUTIFULL CALLIGRAPHY, CLEAR PRINTING. 295 PAGES. ENGLISH UNIVERSITY PRESS, LONDON 1943.

https://archive.org/details/TeachYourselfArabicByTriton

 

2. FABULAS DE LOQMÁN; VERTIDAS EM PORTUGUEZ e paraphrasesdas em versos hebraicos (1898)  Author: Luqman; Sociedade de Geografia de Lisboa; Bénoliel, Joseph; Wogue, Lazare Eliszer, 1817-1897.    Subject: Fables, Arabic. Publisher: Lisboa : Imprensa nacional.  Book contributor: University of California Libraries.  Collection: cdl; americana

 

http://archive.org/details/fabulasdeloqmn00luqm

MEMORIZE O TEXTO PORTUGUÊS E DECIFRE O ÁRABE

 

 

INTRODUÇÃO AO ESTUDO DA LINGUA ÁRABE MODERNA

1. A LÍNGUA ÁRABE, COMO LER O SEU ALFABETO
     HOW DO QUICKLY LEARN THE ARABIC ALPHABET

Neste  primeiro volume da obra do professor Johanan Kapliwatzky podemos  aprender a ler rapidamente o alfabeto da língua árabe e obter uma boa  introdução ao estudo da sua gramática suficiente para começar a leitura de textos simples. 
With this  short volume on the Arabic language we can quickly learn how to read the Arabic alphabet and get important hints into its basic grammar.
 
ARABIC LANGUAGE AND GRAMMAR 1. JOCHANAN KAPLIWATZKY 

THE ARABIC LANGUAGE AND GRAMMAR, PART 1, 1938 BY DR. JOHANAN KAPLIWATZKY, THIRTEENTH EDITION 1979. SIXTY LESSONS OF ARABIC, VOCABULARY AND KEY. AN EASY INTRODUCTION INTO WRITTEN ARABIC, IN 168 PAGES .

LÍNGUA E GRAMÁTICA ÁRABE. PARTE PRIMEIRA. ESTA PARTE DA OBRA ENSINA A LER O ALFABETO E DÁ  NOÇÕES PRELIMINARES DE GRAMÁTICA SUFICIENTES PARA LER TEXTOS SIMPLES.

Aprender vocabulário deve ser a principal preocupação do estudante de árabe. Com os recursos multilíngues que já estão presentes nos computadores ou na internet é possível copiar  textos e editá-los normalmente. Aprender a ler caligrafia árabe é também necessário. Há várias versões caligráficas do alfabeto árabe. Procure na internet <Arabic Caligraphy>.

A civilização árabe é parte integrante da formação dos povos ibéricos, estudá-la é ampliar o conhecimento da nossa própria história. 

O melhor e maior dicionário Árabe- Inglês  é o Modern Written Arabic de HANS WEHR, on line, e em  formato de pocket book, com edição original em alemão.

Sobre este  grande dicionario,  e o tipo de língua árabe que ele contem,  ler  on line o artigo publicado  por  LADISLAV DROZDÍK do Institute of Oriental and African Studies, da  Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovakia , publicado em  Asian And African Studies, 7, 1998, com o título Modern Written Arabic in Hans Wehr´s Arabisches Wörterbuch Für Die Schriftsprache der Gegenwart (1st , 5th Editions)
 

The download of the Wehr-Cowan work is  possible also from:

 [PDF].A DICTIONARY OF MODERN WRITTEN ARABIC – StudyQuran

A reproduction of the pocket book edition . 1139pages.

www.studyquran.org/resources/HansWehr-cowan.pdf
 
Um site francês que dá informações sobre árabe e outros idiomas é o LEXICOLOGOS, que disponibiliza um teclado árabe.
 
 

A obra  An Introduction to Modern Literary Arabic, por  David Cowan, foi traduzida para o português pela  Prof.  Dra.  Safa Abou Chahla Jubran, professora doutora do Departamento de Linguas Orientais da Universidade de São Paulo, com o titulo alterado para: GRAMATICA DO ARABE MODERNO. David Cowan. Editora, Ano. Visite o site  Publicações Letras Orientais  da  Faculdade de Filosofia Letras e Ciências Humanas [FFLCH/ USP]. www.letrasorientais.fflch.usp.br/arabe/185

Sobre David Cowan ,An Introduction to Modern Literary Arabic, e outros dos melhores livros existentes para estudar, em inglês, o idioma  árabe, veja a transcrição  de um texto do Prof. Thomas F. Ogara,  tirado do site da Amazon, um ótimo lugar para pesquisar sobre língua árabe.
The Arabist , Thomas F. Ogara, while providing  an  extensive  and learned customer review of David Cowan´s book  for Amazon, also reviewed  Kapliwatzky, now available on line in Archive. org :
 [ QUOTE] THOMAS F. OGARA:  This review is for  An Introduction to Modern Literary Arabic (Paperback)  

This introduction to the literary language is indeed excellent. Cowan provides detailed, clear explanations of grammatical points and moves in a logical progression through the material. The book is most decidedly not of the "Teach Yourself" type, in that it is presumed that the reader is educated and familiar with grammatical terminology, and it does not interface with the spoken language.

I can only compare it with Haywood and Nahmad's "New Arabic Grammar of the Written Language", which it resembles considerably. (Cowan was published by Cambridge, whereas Haywood and Nahmad was published by Oxford - interesting!).

I learned Arabic with the Haywood and Nahmad book, which I preferred and which I felt provided more background material than Cowan. Cowan is much more concise, which in my opinion is not necessarily an asset in this subject. You may want to check out both of these books; they are both still in print, both available through Amazon and were both published about the same time (1950's) and therefore somewhat dated, although not as much as you might think.

If you're shopping around for a self-teacher of literary Arabic a third title you may investigate is Wheeler Thackston's "Introduction to Koranic and Classical Arabic", which is also available through Amazon and which some students might find more amenable. Professor Thackston expects the would-be learner to be intelligent, but possibly less linguistically sophisticated than the Oxbridge books do.

The only other choice I would recommend is a set of four books by an Austrian Arabist named Kapliwatzky (The books are in English). They were first published in the 1940's and were in print up until at least 20 years ago. Kapliwatzky really teaches you the classical idiom, and when you're done with him you can read Abu Nuwas without difficulty. I gave them away to a budding Arabic student some time ago and I have regretted it ever since. Does anybody know if they're still around? [ END OF QUOTE]     

http://www.amazon.com/An-Introduction-Modern-Literary-Arabic/dp/052109240X/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

ARABIC STUDIES. RESEARCH ON THE EXACT SCIENCES IN THE SLAMIC WORLD. THE PROJECT OF THE STAATSBIBLIOTHEK-BERLIN. Projeto de reprodução digitalizada de manuscritos islamicos pré-modernos sobre ciencias exatas na Biblioteca Estatal de Berlim.

Islamic Scientific Manuscripts Initiative (ISMI).

 Statement of Significance   

http://staatsbibliothek-berlin.de/die-staatsbibliothek/abteilungen/orient/aufgaben-profil/projekte/digitalisierung/

This project aims to make available a vast array of information about the exact sciences in the premodern Islamic world. Through the internet, this material will be accessible without charge both to researchers and experts in the field and to the educated public worldwide. It will be an online database that contains the works of some 1,700 authors who span the entire Islamic world from Islamic Spain to India and the borders of China, beginning in the eighth century and continuing until the nineteenth. These works in astronomy, mathematics, physics, geography, mechanics, and related disciplines number in the thousands and are represented, conservatively speaking, by tens of thousands of manuscript copies spread throughout the world.

These works and authors were part of a vibrant tradition, virtually without parallel until the European Renaissance. They influenced scientific work in East Asia, India, and Byzantium and were a major source and inspiration for modern science. This tradition also provides us with a unique opportunity to understand the role of rationalism in traditional Islamic societies and the interplay of science and religion within them. But despite our knowledge of specific individuals, texts, and innovations, which has grown considerably in the past generation, we still do not know a great deal about the social foundations for this scientific work, and one finds in the literature a wide divergence of opinions. Some have maintained that this scientific activity was marginal, with little importance for the society at large, whereas others have argued that it had great importance and indeed occupied a prominent place within a number of Islamic societies. In either scenario, these matters have more than scholarly interest for our contemporary world, to wit because of the West’s current interest in the Islamic world, the Islamic world’s attempts to understand historically the dynamics of its religious and secular spheres, and, more generally, the widespread desire to comprehend science as a humanistic enterprise.

The ISMI database project has been designed to contribute to our understanding of these vital matters. Much more than a simple catalogue, it will provide the user with information on the authors, content of the texts, readership and ownership, institutional locations where the manuscripts were copied, studied, and taught, the relationship of original texts and their commentaries and supercommentaries, and other information that will help draw a picture of the social and intellectual contexts of these works. Of particular interest will be the capability of the database to allow for research into issues of the relationship of science and religion in Islam. For example, it will provide information on the teaching of the sciences and mathematics that occurred in the Islamic religious schools (madrasa's) as well as the extent to which scientific material was used by religious scholars in their writings.

In addition, the database could also be used by scholars doing research into the history of Islamic and European scientific interactions, and it will also be useful for non-professionals who wish to find out about Islamic scientists, their works, and their social milieu.

This project is a collaborative effort between members of the Institute of Islamic Studies at McGill University and the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Berlin, Germany, with a board of advisors and an international network of individual and institutional affiliates. Thus far the first version of the database has been designed and successfully tested, and it currently contains entries for some 1,100 authors, several hundred entries for titles and manuscripts, and supplementary material for a number of them. Funding has been secured from the Canada Foundation for Innovation and the Max Planck Institute, and in the coming years the project will: 1) fund staff and researchers who will collect, verify, and enter data into the database; 2) enhance and maintain the database and make it permanently available online; 3) offset travel expenses for research trips to various libraries worldwide; and, 4) fund international conferences in Berlin, Montreal, and elsewhere that would bring together curators, researchers, staff, the board of advisors, and institutional affiliates to discuss how best to implement the project. DARCY CARVALHO. [08/07/2013]





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